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K.J.M. Dickinson
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Publications

  • Altitudinal patterns of vegetation, flora, life forms, and environments in the alpine zone of the Fiord Ecological Region, New Zealand

    Authors
    Alan Mark, T. Maegli, K.J.M. Dickinson, S. Porter, J.J. Piggott, P. Michel
    Journal
    New Zealand Journal of Botany
    Year
    2008
    The altitudinal zonation patterns of vegetation structure, vascular flora, and life/growth forms were comprehensively assessed in relation to temperature and soil factors from treeline (1040 m) to the... REGISTER NOW TO SEE MORE
  • Maximizing water yield with indigenous non-forest vegetation: A New Zealand perspective

    Authors
    Alan Mark, K.J.M. Dickinson
    Journal
    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
    Year
    2008
    Provision of clean freshwater is an essential ecosystem service that is under increasing pressure worldwide from a variety of conflicting demands. Water yields differ in relation to land-cover type. S... REGISTER NOW TO SEE MORE
  • Ploughing boulders on the Rock and Pillar Range, south-central New Zealand: Their geomorphology and alpine plant associations

    Authors
    Alan Mark, T. Maegli, K.J.M. Dickinson, S.W. Grab
    Journal
    Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand
    Year
    2008
    The first Southern Hemisphere descriptions of the geomorphology of currently active ploughing boulders, together with a wide range of relevant site factors and associated vegetation patterns, are prov... REGISTER NOW TO SEE MORE
  • What limits a rare alpine plant species? Comparative demography of three endemic species of Myosotis (Boraginaceae)

    Authors
    Alan Mark, K.J.M. Dickinson, D. Kelly, G. Wells, R. Clayton
    Journal
    Austral Ecology
    Year
    2007
    Establishing what are the underlying causes of species range limits is of fundamental interest in ecology. We followed the fate of individually mapped plants of three endemic New Zealand high-alpine s... REGISTER NOW TO SEE MORE

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